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A River-Friendly Landscaping Guide to Mulch & Grasscycling +The River-Friendly Landscaping Program has produced this guide as a public service to aid homeowners and landscape professionals in the reuse and reduction of plant debris, and to support other environmental benefits. Mulch is a very important practice in the design, construction and maintenance of landscapes and gardens.  +
Alliance for Water Efficiency +The [http://www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org Alliance for Water Efficiency] is a stakeholder-based nonprofit organization dedicated to the efficient and sustainable use of water. Headquartered in Chicago, the Alliance serves as a North American advocate for water efficient products and programs, and provides information and assistance on water conservation efforts. A diverse Board of Directors governs the organization and has adopted a set of guiding principles and strategic plan.  +
Assessment of Water Demand of Cool-season Turfgrass in California Using Cal-SIMETAW +The main purpose of this study was to utilize the daily soil water balance program “California Simulation of Evapotranspiration of Applied Water” or “Cal-SIMTAW” to estimate crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and evapotranspiration of applied water (ETaw) for cool-season turfgrass on a 4 x 4 km grid spacing over California to support calibration of urban per capita water use.  +

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BMP 1 Utility Operations Programs +Water utilities throughout California are implementing water conservation programs and providing services to the customers they serve. There are four subcategories that comprise signatory utility operation program responsibilities.  +
BMP 4 Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional +Commercial, industrial, and institutional (CII) water demands make up a large percentage of total demand for California. CII water use varies dramatically between business sectors as well as within a given water agency’s territory. The goal of this BMP is to implement comprehensive yet flexible best management practices, allowing each water agency to tailor the implementation of each practice to fit local needs and opportunities. The end result is a practice that is successful and will produce the greatest amount of cost-effective water savings.  +
BMP 5 Landscape +Irrigation accounts for a large portion of urban water use in California. Irrigation water use varies dramatically depending on water pricing and availability, plant choice, geographic locations, seasonal conditions, and the level of commitment to sound water efficiency practices. The goal of this BMP is that irrigators, with assistance from signatories, will achieve a higher level of water use efficiency consistent with the actual irrigation needs of the plant materials. Reaching this goal would reduce overall demands for water, reduce demands during the peak summer months, and still result in a healthy and vibrant landscape for California.  +
Boilerless Steamers +Steamers are used in high-volume sectors of the food industry to cook and warm food. Conventional steamers have a plumbing hookup to send water into the steamer where it is heated to make steam, and a drain to the sewer where condensate water is disposed. In addition, since wastewater agencies prohibit the dumping of steam or hot water down the sewer, conventional steamers cool the condensate with tap water to bring it into compliance with regulations, all of which is disposed of down the drain. Since conventional steamers can take 15 minutes to warm up, they are often left on throughout the workday (FSTC 2003). Water efficient steamers make use of several technologies separately or in combination to save water and energy: 1) convection fans reduce cook time by distributing steam in the oven, 2) vacuum systems reduce the boil temperature of water, 3) “no-boiler” designs that heat water only as needed, 4) self-contained systems that recycle condensate, and 4) microwave designs that use very small amounts or no added water.  +

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CII Task Force Water Use BMPs +This article contains the contents executive summary of the Commercial, Industrial and Institutional Task Force Water Use Best Management Practices Report to the Legislature. <br> This report, Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional Task Force Water Use Best Management Practices Report to the Legislature, identifies specific best management practices (BMPs) and actions to support the commercial, industrial, and institutional (CII) sectors efforts to improve water use efficiency and support California’s water supply sustainability. It is intended to provide the CII sectors with information on water-saving technologies and BMPs applicable in the CII sectors. The report is also intended for use as a resource for: *Existing and new businesses, facilities, and institutions *Developers, consultants, and designers *Water service providers *Planning agencies *Policy makers Since technology and practices change over time, the information in this report is intended and recommended to be updated periodically. This report also provides the CII sector with valuable information to capture the multiple benefits of reduced costs for water, energy, wastewater, and onsite water and wastewater treatment facilities. Water efficient landscape BMPs are also included because outdoor water use may represent a significant percentage of CII water use. Recommendations include BMPs, actions for implementation, metrics, and the use of alternate water sources for certain applications.  +
CII surveys: Cooling and Industrial Processes +Commercial, Institutional, and Industrial (CII) surveys can range from short “walkthroughs” to sophisticated water efficiency studies. Customers are targeted with a marketing strategy and incentives. Recommendations are made to reduce water consumption at the facility. The recommended actions may then be implemented by the site managers. One challenge is understanding the actual water savings that results from surveys; most of the published literature estimates saving from recommended conservation measures, but not the actual savings determined in a follow-up study. One cannot underemphasize the need to distinguish between savings potential and actual savings when reading the CII survey literature. Recommended measures include sanitation, irrigation, kitchen, industrial, cooling, laundry, wastewater, and others. Savings and cost data for faucets, urinals, ULF toilets, and landscape irrigation are examined in other sections of this document. This section focuses on cooling towers and industrial process savings. Two broad categories of water loss in cooling towers include bleed-off (draining cooling water) and uncontrolled losses (drift loss from mist and leaks). In some parts of California nearly all cooling towers are re-circulating systems (as opposed to single pass systems) and many of these have conductivity controllers to automatically manage total dissolved solids by adjusting bleed-off and make-up. Water savings potential for multi-pass systems are related to (1) better tuned conductivity controllers and (2) adding conductivity controllers if not present. ' Industrial process savings is a large category of potential savings, but is as diverse in nature as the industrial base. Industrial processes may include: metal plating, electronics fabrication, photographic processing, product water and rinses, in-plant cleaning, sterilizers, container cleaning, kitchens and water treatment and regeneration.  +
CalWEP lending library +CalWEP has a lending library of conservation materials for CalWEP members. Please contact us at office@calwep.org if you are interested in checking out any of the below items. Some of the below items will be accessible online through the publisher.  +
California Water Plan 2013 Update (selections) +This article contains excerpts from the California Water Plan (Update 2013). View the DWR webpage for more information on the [http://www.water.ca.gov/waterplan/ California Water Plan]. <br> '''Highlights: A Catalyst for Action''' ''California Water Plan Update 2013'' (Update 2013) is a resource and tool to guide investment priorities and legislative action and ensure resilient and sustainable water resources moving forward based on decades of scientific data and analyses, nearly 40 State agency plans, and the voices of hundreds of stakeholders. Update 2013 applies at statewide, regional, and local scales and serves to advise a diverse audience, including elected officials, planners and resource managers, tribal governments and communities, academia, and the general public. Consistent with State law, Update 2013 lays out recommendations rather than mandates.  +
Clothes Washers (Residential) +Water suppliers that have signed the Council’s [http://testwiki.cuwcc.org/w/index.php?title=Memorandum_of_Understanding_Regarding_Urban_Water_Conservation_in_California Memorandum of Understanding] (MOU) must either provide incentives or institute ordinances that require the purchase of high-efficiency clothes washers meeting an average Water Factor of 5.0. If WaterSense adopts a lower Water Factor standard in the future, MOU signatories must comply with this lower standard. This is how the clothes washer Best Management Practice (BMP) is described in the MOU. Several end-use studies in single-family settings have shown that clothes washing accounts for indoor water demand that is second only to toilets. Therefore, improving clothes washer efficiency has been a prominent goal among water suppliers interested in promoting conservation. Water suppliers have adopted a two-pronged approach for achieving this goal. They have advocated for mandatory water-use efficiency appliance standards; and they have implemented rebate programs to incentivize the retrofit of old inefficient washers.  +
Clothes Washers - Coin-Operated +Our analyses suggest that there are roughly 480,000 coin-operated washers in California spread across commercial laundromats and common wash rooms in multifamily buildings. The prevalence of top-loaders among laundromats and multifamily buildings is 34 and 74 percent, respectively. With new federal efficiency standards going into effect in 2013, water demand associated with coin-operated washers will decline over time. Market transformation through financial incentives can accelerate this process. If the prevalence of top-loaders is brought down to 20 percent we estimate that future water demand associated with this end use could be lowered by 28,000 acre-feet per year. Given current avoided cost of water, and likely savings from retrofit of old top-loaders with high-efficiency front loaders, utilities can cost-effectively offer large financial incentives to promote water use efficiency in this sector. Energy savings, while not evaluated here, are also expected to be significant, making joint initiatives between water and energy suppliers an attractive option. The finding of cost-effective savings suggests that coin-op washer retrofits should be considered a best management practice, and water utilities following the Flex Track or GPCD Compliance Approach should consider adding such a program to their existing portfolio if this portfolio appears inadequate for meeting future targets.  +
Clothes washers (residential) +Water suppliers that have signed the Council’s [[Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Urban Water Conservation in California|Memorandum of Understanding]] (MOU) must either provide incentives or institute ordinances that require the purchase of high-efficiency clothes washers meeting an average Water Factor of 5.0. If WaterSense adopts a lower Water Factor standard in the future, MOU signatories must comply with this lower standard. This is how the clothes washer Best Management Practice (BMP) is described in the MOU. Several end-use studies in single-family settings have shown that clothes washing accounts for indoor water demand that is second only to toilets. Therefore, improving clothes washer efficiency has been a prominent goal among water suppliers interested in promoting conservation. Water suppliers have adopted a two-pronged approach for achieving this goal. They have advocated for mandatory water-use efficiency appliance standards; and they have implemented rebate programs to incentivize the retrofit of old inefficient washers.  +
Community based social marketing +CalWEP has prepared a Community-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) resource package. It consists of the following three components: (1) CBSM Case-Study Review Summary Report, (2) CBSM Pilot Framework Design, and (3) CBSM Landscape and Outdoor Water Survey and Best Practices Guidance Document. This off-the-shelf resource package is intended to provide water agencies and other interested parties with background knowledge and an initial blueprint for launching their own CBSM program. The project was funded by DWR’s California Water Efficient Products Initiative grant. EBMUD served as the primary grantee and CalWEP a primary signatory. Both CalWEP staff, and the consulting firm Cadmus, Inc. developed the materials, with feedback from a subset of CalWEP members. The survey has been pre-loaded to CalWEP’s Online SurveyMonkey account and is available for transfer to other SurveyMonkey account holders. Public release of the complete CBSM resource package is scheduled for Winter 2017 (see Highlighted Resources for pdf downloads of the survey and survey guide).  +
Conservation Pricing +Conservation pricing provides incentives to customers to reduce water use.  +
Cooling Water Efficiency (commercial industrial) +Commercial and industrial (mechanical) cooling systems have become commonplace throughout the United States and the world over the last 60 years. Improved indoor environments due to air conditioning systems enhance the productivity of millions of workers around the world. In addition, commercial and industrial refrigeration systems lengthen the shelf life of perishable foods, minimizing exposure to harmful bacteria and spoilage, thereby allowing the transportation of these foods over vast distances. Industrial cooling systems help make many processes and products possible we normally take for granted. Since the advent of the ammonia and vapor compression refrigeration cycles, these systems have become an increasingly more important in numerous aspects of our daily lives even though we are largely unaware of their presence.  +
Cost and Savings Study +Over the years the Council commissioned a series of Cost and Savings reports to develop methods and data to better ascertain economic analysis and water savings related to water conservation best management practices (and potential BMPs). The original 2000 CSS included sections on definitions of key concepts, descriptions of 14 water saving devices and activities, an annotated literature review, examples of cost-benefit analysis, and cost-effectiveness analysis, as well as known areas where future research is needed. In 2016 the Council recently completed an update to the Cost and Savings Studies.  +
Culver City Rainwater Harvesting Program +The tool is the final report for a pilot rainwater harvesting project outlining an implementation template and cost-benefit analyses associated with implementing a rain barrel / rain garden installation program. The analyses include assessments of outreach and advertising effectiveness, rain barrel retrofits, and rain garden construction. Additionally, the tool includes a comprehensive "How-to-Guide" for residential homeowners to install rain barrels and rain gardens and outreach documents (e.g. brochures, stickers) which may be modified for future programs.  +
Customer Programs and Communication +This primer identifies popular and effective water efficiency and conservation programs, and communication and outreach strategies that have been used by California water utilities to educate customers, influence water use behaviors, and realize water savings. This primer contains the following: *An index of water efficiency programs; *Strategies for how water providers can communicate with their customers; *Strategies for how water providers can communicate with the media; and *References linking examples of effective water efficiency programs and communication strategies.  +
Customer Water Use Messaging +Addressing human behavior as a strategy for efficient use of resources is embedded in most conservation programs and lessons from the social sciences are now being incorporated into the development of behavior-based efficiency programs. The potential contributions from social psychology and behavioral economics for resource efficiency and behavior programs are being used and tested broadly across sustainability and environmental fields. (Vigen & Mazur-Stommen, 2012).  +

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Design Templates TEST Information +Western Municipal Landscape District site including information to help as well as landscape design templates for residential yards in inland southern California  +
Design Templates TEST Programs +Western Municipal Water District landscape design templates and programs for residential yards in inland southern California.  +
Discount Rates +This article looks at the benefits of using discount rates to encourage water conservation, and explores three reasons water suppliers should consider them. First, DWR in the past has required water suppliers wishing to tap bond-financed grant funds, such as, Proposition 50 and other such funding sources to use a real discount rate of 6% in their proposals. Second, water suppliers are no longer operating in a world where they can opt out of conservation on cost-effectiveness grounds. Third, it makes little conceptual sense to use different discount rates, one for DWR-funded projects and another for internally funded projects.  +
Dishwashers (Commercial) +The warewashing (dishwashing) industry is multifaceted. It produces equipment for both the food service industry and for medical and laboratory facilities. This report will focus only on dishwashing equipment found in the food service industry. NSF International, a certifying body that provides a directory of commercial dishwashers, currently lists approximately 900 individual machine models in today’s marketplace. These machines are found in diverse settings ranging from conventional restaurants to health care and other institutional food service facilities, as well as to catering and similar food preparation operations. Equipment has been designed for specific purposes such as general dish, pot and pan, and glass washing. <br /> '''Purpose''' The purpose of this document is to describe the place that warewashing has in the overall restaurant and food service operation's water use profile and to describe how water efficiency thresholds and technologies for this equipment are changing. '''Topics''' In order to fully describe water use characteristics of warewashing within the context of overall food service operations, a number of topics are covered, including: ::*A brief overall of water use in scullery operations ::*The role of warewashing in these operations ::*Type and classification of warewashing equipment ::*Description of equipment operations ::*Trends in equipment water use ::*Dishwashing equipment size considerations ::*Dishwasher market dynamics ::*Regulations and incentives ::*Water use characteristics ::*Potential future water savings for California  +
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